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Table 1 Participant information

From: Initial evidence that non-clinical autistic traits are associated with lower income

  Study 1 Study 2 Study 3 Study 4 Study 5
N 183 350 400 979 579
Male 64.5% 60.9% 60.5% 51.4% 46.5%
Gender not given 0.5% 0.2% 0.9%
Age range and mean 18–64
32.53
(9.91)
19–75
36.52
(11.12)
20–75
37.34
(12.17)
18–79
37.43
(12.09)
19–84
36.80
(11.91)
Net household income $36,709
($2256)
$41,273
($2139)
$40,257 ($2392) $60,744
($2337)
$59,689
($2335)
Adjusted household income $21,666
($2260)
$29,018
($2051)
$27,827
(2125)
Personal income $26,641
($2919)
$24,798
($2932)
Others’ income $32,939
($3785)
$35,950
($3268)
SSS 4.69 (1.65) 4.91 (1.76)
AQ 65.18 (11.73) 66.23 (11.16) 92.15 (16.04) 93.82 (15.22) 66.92 (9.83)
% live alone 29.75% 22.98% 21.93%
Adults 1.97 (0.91) 2.15 (1.01) 2.16 (1.04)
Children 0.42 (0.91) 0.50 (0.92) 0.63 (1.04)
  1. Values in parentheses are standard deviations. AQ refers to scores on the short-form Autism Spectrum Quotient. For income measures, the values are geometric means calculated by exponentiating the arithmetic mean of ln(x + 1) where x is the income in thousands per year; similarly, the income standard deviations are the exponentiated standard deviation of ln(x + 1). Others’ income is the net income of all other members of the household, for those participants who do not live alone (N = 754 and N = 452 for studies 4 and 5, respectively). Studies 3 and 4 used a 6-point response scale for the AQ, which is why the means are much higher than for other studies. % live alone indicates the proportion of participants whose household consists of just one person; adults and children are the mean number of adults (including the participant) and children in the household