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Table 1 Descriptive and inferential statistics for differences between boys and girls

From: No relationship between early postnatal testosterone concentrations and autistic traits in 18 to 30-month-old children

  Boys (B) Girls (G) All B vs. G
  n M SD n M SD n M SD t p d a
Testosterone at mini-puberty (pg/ml) 39 79.68 22.56 47 67.98 20.19 86 73.29 21.97 2.54 .013 .55
Q-CHAT scores 40 28.83 6.89 47 25.74 7.23 87 27.62 7.24 2.06 .042 .43
Birth weight (kg) 40 3.39 .53 47 3.42 .43 87 3.41 .48 −.27 .790 −.06
Child’s age at saliva sampling (weeks) 40 7.62 1.67 47 8.00 2.19 87 7.82 1.96 −.90 .369 −.19
Child’s age at Q-CHAT assessment (months) 40 22.47 3.55 47 22.31 3.38 87 22.39 3.44 .22 .830 .05
Maternal age (years) 40 34.52 3.23 46 33.95 4.45 86 34.21 3.92 .67 .504 .14
Paternal age (years) 39 35.96 3.65 46 36.51 5.92 85 36.26 4.99 −.50 .620 −.11
Maternal education 40 4.65 .48 47 4.64 .53 87 4.64 .51 .11 .915 .02
Paternal education 40 4.50 .64 47 4.68 .52 87 4.60 .58 −1.46 .148 −.31
Number of siblings 40 .58 .87 47 .60 .74 87 .59 .80 −.12 .905 −.02
  1. aPositive ds indicate higher values in boys than girls
  2. Note. Maternal and paternal education was rated on a 5-point scale from 1 (primary education only) to 5 (postgraduate degree)